Recent Posts

How Can We Help Your Commercial Business?

10/19/2021 (Permalink)

There are many ways SERVPRO of Parker and Northeast Hood Counties can help your commercial business! We provide a variety of cleaning expertise that could always be put to use in your commercial building. Here are just a few of our cleaning services that we would love to provide for you.

Carpet Cleaning:

                A yearly carpet cleaning can remove offensive smells and stains, provide fresher air due to removal of dust and dandruff, and bring longevity to your carpets.

Air Duct Cleaning:

                The airflow going in to your building, should be fresh without any foul smells. Having your air ducts cleaned can provide cleaner, better smelling, bacteria free air.

Deodorization:

                Deodorizing a building brings an overall better smell to the area. With people going in and out, coffee spills, human function, or really anything that can bring on tough odors, smells of all sorts start to linger. This can bring an overall better smell to your building.

Document Drying:

                If your commercial building were to flood or the fire sprinklers were to be triggered, the important files and documents could become ruined. SERVPRO provides document drying which basically means, we will dry and restore to our best ability, your documents, books, pictures, and files.

                If you would like to learn more about our services and how we can help you, do not hesitate to call and ask! (817)596-8714

Cleaning Hack: Glass Stove Tops

10/12/2021 (Permalink)

Glass stove tops can add a sleek, modern look to any kitchen.  They also come with the major perk of not having to worry about cleaning grates or drip pans.  Everything has its downfall though.  Anyone who has ever owned or used a glass stovetop knows that the smallest splatter immediately becomes an eyesore as it is much more noticeable.  If the stove is not cleaned after use, these noticeable blemishes can become difficult to remove as well as potentially becoming a fire hazard.

Stoves in general tend to collect water spots, grease, and burnt crumbs better than any other common home appliance.  While cleaning your stove is obviously important, it can bring up questions such as, "How do I remove the grease without leaving scratches?" "What cleaner do I use to make sure there isn't a weird film left behind?" "The water spots are too resilient for basic cleaner.  What can I use to remove these?".

Here are 7 cleaning hacks that you can use to clean even the toughest messes off of your glass stove top.

  1. Sprinkle baking soda over the problem areas and cover with a hot towel.  
    • This is a common method used to remove stuck on grease and grime.  All it entails is sprinkling baking soda over the problem area, running a towel under hot water, placing said towel over the baking soda, and allowing it to sit for 15mins.  After the 15mins is up, you should be able to use that same towel and rub it over the area in circular motions to remove the baking soda and grease.  If a residue is left behind, you can use a microfiber cloth to buff it off.  No expensive products, no elbow grease, and no frustration.
  2. Use a razor blade to scrape off water stains

    • I'm sure we've all experienced that moment when water boils over the top of the pot and leaves that annoying ring of water burned onto the stove.  While these are a bit more difficult to remove, it isn't impossible.  With this hack, you'll want to proceed with caution.  Using a flat razor blade and running it straight across the water stain will remove this spot.  Be sure to keep the blade straight and not at an angle in order to prevent scratching.  If the blade alone is struggling to remove the residue, try laying a hot towel over the area to loosen things up.
  3. Distilled white  vinegar.
    • This alone may not remove tough stains but if you're looking for a good product to use for every day cleaning, this is it.  It is affordable, easy to find, and easy to use.  Not only that, but it doesn't leave a residue to be burned off like a lot of other products do.
  4. Combine dawn dish soap, baking soda, and hydrogen peroxide.  
    • This one requires gloves, a scrubbing brush, and some elbow grease.  Some stains are truly a pain to get off.  If none of these other methods have worked for you, then this surely will.  First, squirt dawn dish soap over the stove top.  Then, cover with baking soda.  Finally, add about a tablespoon of hydrogen peroxide over top of the solution.  Once all of the products have been applied, proceed to scrub with a dish brush but make sure to be wearing gloves to prevent having direct contact with this solution.  Once you have scrubbed for a few minutes and the mixture is fully combined, allow it to sit for about 3 more minutes and then wipe away with a microfiber cloth.
  5. Car wax to prevent future difficulties.

    • Take some car wax, buff it on top of your clean stove, wipe away the excess with a paper towel, and then any future grease or grime should wipe right off.
  6. Use a glass cleaner once the stove has been successfully cleaned.

    • This will remove any streaks that may have been left behind to make your glass stove look brand new.
  7. Typical stove cleaner

    • Obviously you can skip the hassle and try using a general store-bought stove cleaner to help remove any problem areas.  Be sure to follow the instructions on the cleaner of your choice to ensure optimum results.

To keep that sleek, minimalist look that a glass stovetop provides, as well as prevent fire hazards due to stuck on grease and grime, try out these cleaning hacks.

As always, if you have experienced a fire in your home or business, call SERVPRO of Parker and Northeast Hood Counties! 817-596-8714

Tornado Safety

10/5/2021 (Permalink)

What is the difference between a 'tornado watch' and a 'tornado warning'?  According to the Red Cross, a 'tornado watch' means that there is potential for a tornado to form.  A 'tornado warning' means that there is already a tornado or one is about to form.  

So what do you do in this situation?  Chances are, if you've been tied into a tornado warning before, you already have an idea of what to keep with you.  However, if you're new to a location that is known to participate in Mother Nature's spinoff (no pun intended) of the children's game 'Twister', there are a few things that you should know as far as preparation goes.

What to Do When You Get Word of a Tornado Watch:

Don't wait for the tornado watch to turn into a tornado warning before stocking your safe space.  When you receive word of a watch, immediately begin packing your safe space (which we'll get to in a minute).  Also keep the news or a radio on and listen to the current weather report.  You'll want to keep track of what is going on and when it is going on so you know how to better prepare.  Let your children, spouse, or other housemates know what's going on so they can stay in the loop (also no pun intended).  Communication in this situation truly is key as we don't want anybody unaware of the determined procedure.  You may consider walking to a neighbor or a friend's house nearby if they have a storm shelter or basement to seek refuge in.  

Where should your refuge be located:

One thing is for certain: if you live in a trailer house or mobile home, you'll want to find a sturdier structure to seek shelter in.  In fact, if you  live in a mobile home in an area that is at risk for having a tornado, you might consider investing in placing a storm shelter on site.

Other practical places to seek refuge include 

  • basements
  • rooms with no windows and few doors located on the lowest floor
  • bathrooms
  • under a sturdy piece of furniture with a mattress, blanket, or towel covering your head and neck
  • closets
  • pantries

Where not to seek refuge

  • rooms or spaces located on the top floor of the house or building
  • cars
  • rooms with windows
  • avoid being near bridges or highway overpasses if you are outside during this time
  • areas located directly underneath a heavy object (ex. when in the basement, don't hide directly under the fridge or piano located in the room above.  The structure of the house could be compromised, causing the object to fall through.)

If you are outside when a tornado hits, run to the nearest sturdy building or even a drainpipe.  The car is not a safe place to seek refuge in this situation.  However, if you do get trapped in the car, keep your seatbelt on, the engine running,  tuck your head down below the windows, and cover as much of your body, especially your head with a blanket or coat to protect against broken glass or flying debris.

Now that we have determined where the safe space should be located, it's time to determine what needs to be placed inside of that safe space.

What to pack in your safe space

  • non perishable food items
  • water
  • flashlight
  • radio
  • portable charger
  • batteries
  • blankets
  • diapers, bottles, formula, etc. if you have a baby
  • toys for children
  • medication

Now that you have your safe space picked out and fully stocked with what you need, it's time to really start watching the weather.  Hopefully you have been listening to the weather report this whole time though.  Here are a few things that you should look for as far as weather conditions go.

Weather conditions that indicate a tornado

  • a dark green colored sky
  • a large, dark, low lying cloud
  • large hail
  • a loud sound that sounds like a freight train

If any of these weather conditions occur, seek refuge IMMEDIATELY!  Fortunately, you already know where to hide at this point and you have all of the materials you need already placed in the shelter.  Once the tornado hits, there's not much you can do except protect yourself and wait it out.  As always, if your home or business does happen to play victim to tornado damage and you are in need of a crew to help clean it up, you can trust SERVPRO of Parker and Northeast Hood Counties to do the job.  Give us a call at 817-596-8714.

Personal Protective Equipment | Water

9/28/2021 (Permalink)

Here at SERVPRO, we aim to keep our employees as safe as possible.  One of the ways that we go about this is by providing what we call PPE, or personal protective equipment.  This is equipment or clothing articles that our crew uses when dealing with certain hazardous materials or substances.  An example of a hazardous situation that would require PPE is a water loss.  

With water losses, there are three categories that we like to consider to determine how contaminated the water is. Category 1 is clean water that doesn't pose any threat to humans.  An example of this could be tap water straight from the sink.  Category 2, grey water, meant that the water contains some contaminants and could cause a human illness if ingested. This may come from broken toilets or sump pumps.  Finally, category 3 is called black water.  This water is highly contaminated and my include biohazardous materials such as urine or feces.  These categories are greatly considered when determining what PPE is necessary while performing the mitigation process. Here are a few examples of PPE that we use during a water loss and what justifies us wearing them.

  • Gloves are a staple piece for our crew.  No matter the job or the category of the loss our team is always wearing a pair of gloves.
  • Rubber boots are always worn when there is standing water in any room of the house.  Wet socks are uncomfortable enough as is.  Add some contaminants in there and you've got a recipe for disaster.
  • Safety goggles are another staple piece in our PPE closet, and for obvious reasons.  Our crew is highly susceptible to getting things in their eyes while working.  Safety goggles will shield their eyes from water, insulation, drywall, and anything else that might be floating around.
  • Safety suits are worn when the water loss is a category 3.  This category includes things such as sewage where there are a lot of dangerous contaminants and bacteria in the water that could be incredibly dangerous to our crew members.
  • Respirator masks are also worn when the water is considered highly contaminated and dangerous.  Mold and other bacteria can easily form in this category and can be dangerous to inhale.

These are just a few examples of PPE that our crew wears when handling a water loss.  These items help keep our people safe so that we can create a safe environment for the homeowners as well.  

As always, if you have experienced a water loss in your home or business, give us a call!  You can contact us at 817-596-8715.

What Are Flood Cuts?

9/21/2021 (Permalink)

When a business has endured a water loss or water damage, the mitigation process can be tedious.  If absolutely any moisture is left behind, it may cause secondary damage in the form of mold, or make the building materials unstable.  Of these building materials, we include drywall.  

Once moisture has penetrated your drywall, it only takes about 48 hours for dry drywall to soften exponentially or for mold to begin growing.  In order to prevent this from happening, SERVPRO often removes the bottom 12-18 inches of drywall from a home or business.  This is called performing a 'flood cut'.

Are Flood Cuts Really Necessary?

Moisture isn't always visible to the human eye.  That is why we use our state of the art equipment to detect moisture that may be hiding behind walls.  If moisture is detected, a flood cut is a reliable method that we use to dry out that space.  This entails removing the bottom 12 or 18in of drywall so we can use our equipment to circulate air and avoid the growth of mold behind said drywall in the future.  There are a few factors that we use to determine whether or not a flood cut is necessary.  These factors include

  • How much, if any, insulation is behind the walls.  
  • What category of water affected the area.
  • The length of time that the water was left sitting before being removed.

The intent of the flood cut is to avoid you, as a business owner, having to close your business for an extended period of time due to secondary damage caused by the initial water loss.  Drywall and insulation are both incredibly absorbent and take a long time to dry out, making it the perfect habitat for mold.  If the drywall, insulation, and surrounding areas are not properly cleaned and dried, it will cause even larger and more expensive predicaments in the future.  That is why professionals recommend allowing us to perform a flood cut, to save you from future trouble.

As always, if your business has endured a disaster, give us a call! 871-596-8714

Burn Baby, Burn... Or Don't

9/7/2021 (Permalink)

Do you have a fire extinguisher in your home?  Do you know what kind of fire that extinguisher is made for?  Did you know that homeowners are recommended to have at least FOUR fire extinguishers in their home?  Chances are, probably not.  A common misconception is that one fire extinguisher is made to put out any fire, when in reality, there are actually four different classes of fire extinguishers and they are all made for different purposes.

The four classes of fire extinguishers are labeled "A, B, C, and D".  Class "A" is most commonly the extinguisher found in households because it puts out ordinary combustibles such as paper and wood; this is also the most well known extinguisher. The other three classes will be described below:

  • Class B: Class B extinguishers are for use on flammable liquids like grease, gasoline, and oil.
  • Class C: Class C extinguishers are for use on electrical fires only
  • Class D: Class D extinguishers are designed to put out flammable metals.

Some extinguishers are multipurpose, and can be suitable for two or more classes of fire.  If this is the case, the extinguisher will be labeled as such (A-B, B-C, or A-B-C).  Professionals recommend that every home and business owner have at least one fire extinguisher for each class.  This will ensure preparedness in any burning situation.

When engaging a fire extinguisher, it is important to remember to P.A.S.S.

  1. Pull the pin on the fire extinguisher to break the seal.
  2. Aim the fire extinguisher low, at the base of the fire.
  3. Squeeze the handle of the extinguisher to release the extinguishing agent.
  4. Sweep the nozzle from side to side at the base of the fire until the fire is fully put out.

In case your home does experience the devastation of a fire, SERVPRO of Parker and Northeast Hood Counties can take over the cleaning and restoration process to relieve some of the stress on your shoulders! You can contact us anytime, 24/7, at 817-596-8714.

3 Types of Secondary Damage That Can Occur After a Water Loss

8/31/2021 (Permalink)

When a water loss first occurs, your home will most likely experience immediate damage.  This can include loss of important documents, electrical shortages, or wet drywall.  If the water is not removed quickly and the area is not dried properly, there can also be damage that is caused after the flood.  This is called secondary damage.  The best way to prevent this from happening is to hire a professional to remove the water and reverse the effects of the loss.  However, if not attended to immediately, here are a few examples of secondary damage that you should look out for.

  1. Mold Growth

    • The first, and most familiar example, is mold growth.  Mold loves moist environments.  This is why it is such a common effect of a water loss.  If left untreated, mold can continue to spread and damage other areas of the house.
  2. Warped Hardwood Floors

    • Another familiar cause of water loss is warped hardwood floors.  This is when wood flooring absorbs the moisture sitting on top of it, causing it to disfigure and/or rise off of the foundation.  Warping is why flooring is commonly removed and replaced after a water loss.  Wood furniture can also become disfigured if exposed to moisture.
  3. Corrosion
    • The third example of secondary water damage is corrosion.  If any pipes, screws, or nails were exposed to moisture during a water loss, they may eventually begin to rust.  This can weaken the metal piece and cause it to eventually break.   

When dealing with a water loss, these examples of secondary damage can be detrimental to your home.  Our team here at SERVPRO of Parker and Northeast Hood Counties is trained to look out and resolve these issues BEFORE they occur.  If you are in need of professional mitigation due to a water loss, give us a call at 817-596-8714.

Maintaining Your Smoke Alarm

8/24/2021 (Permalink)

Smoke alarms are one of the most basic fire safety devices that are available to us.  They have been installed in almost every home and business across the board.  What a lot of people don't know though, is that even smoke alarms require a minimum amount of maintenance.  There are just a few things that the U.S. Fire Administration recommends to ensure that your smoke alarm is up to par.

  1. Check your alarms monthly.

    • Although some smoke alarms are self-testing, it is still recommended to manually test them once a month.  This can generally be done by holding down the button in the center of the alarm until it begins to beep.
  2. Replace non-hardwired detectors batteries annually.
    • The last thing you want is to find out that your smoke alarm's batteries are dead.  Chances are that by then, it would be a little too late.
  3. Clean your detectors annually.
    • Your average dust bunnies can, in fact, impede on your alarms performance.  Make sure to take the device off of the wall and see that it is sparkling and not sparking.

It may seem tedious to perform these tasks but it's important to make sure that your smoke alarms aren't being sabotaged.  After all, you probably don't want to be without warning if your home happens to catch fire while you're asleep. A few minutes of your time to ensure that things are working properly is well worth it when your assets are on the line.

Source: Safewise.com

If you do find yourself in need of a fire mitigation crew, call SERVPRO of Parker and Northeast Hood Counties! 817-596-8714

We Are Available 24/7/365

8/17/2021 (Permalink)

If you are frantically googling 'water repair near me', you are most likely in a dire situation that requires assistance ASAP.  Whether it's one o'clock in the morning or one o'clock in the afternoon, SERVPRO of Parker and Northeast Hood Counties is prepared to take on any disastrous situation!  Our team is available around the clock seven days a week.  What truly makes us stand out against similar businesses?  We are the ONLY call you'll need to make.  We will personally clean all salvageable items, remove wet flooring, dry wall, and insulation from the affected area, and use our equipment to dry out the same area and prevent the growth of mold.  We will also take the liberty to contact your insurance adjuster to handle the billing as well as hire a trusted construction company to cover the repairs.  We are adamant about leaving no loose ends.  

If you are experiencing the aftermath of a flood, fire, mold, biohazard, vandalism, or you're in need of a general deep cleaning, give SERVPRO of Parker and Northeast Hood Counties a call at 817-596-8714

The Top Five Causes Of House Fires and How To Avoid Them

8/10/2021 (Permalink)

"Mmm," you moan as the smell of barbeque brushes your nostrils.  Your mouth begins to water, your stomach begins to growl, a warm shiver tickles your spine.  Your body begs for a slice of whatever is cooking in the kitchen, until, all of a sudden, you realize that that's not food at all.  It's your house.  Your house is on fire.

Don't you just hate when that happens! You think you're about to get a hot meal, but instead, you get an insurance claim.  Alright, alright, I'm kidding.  I'm hoping you can tell the difference between Risky's Bar-B-Q, and a risky BBQ (that’s a little pun for y'all around Parker County).

On a serious note, house fires can be seriously detrimental.  They endanger you, your family, your pets, and your assets.  Although there is no sure way to completely prevent sparks from flying, there are some things that should be kept in mind and paid attention to. Here are the five most common causes of house fires and how you can do your best to avoid them.

  • Cooking is the cause of a whopping forty-nine percent of residential fires.  Now that's not giving you permission to eat out every day, but it is encouragement to watch what you put on your stove.  More often than not, these fires are caused by grease that gets overheated.  Grease is an incredibly flammable substance once it reaches about six-hundred degrees Fahrenheit.  When it reaches this point, it can combust spontaneously, even without direct flame contact.
  • Toasters and ovens can also start fires if not cleaned properly.  Oils and crumbs that sit at the bottom of these machines can catch fire when exposed to extreme heat, like they are.
    • How do you prevent these things from causing a fire?  Leaving anything unattended on your stove is not a good place to start, especially if you're cooking something in oil or grease.  Also, make sure to clean your cooking equipment often to ensure that there are no crumbs or oils trapped at the bottom of them.
  • The second most common cause of house fires are heating appliances such as space heaters.  These kinds of fires are less common than ones caused by cooking, causing only twelve percent of residential fires, but can be equally as detrimental.  Heaters that are fueled by kerosine are especially dangerous, as the fuel is extremely flammable.  Electric heaters can also be dangerous if the electrical wires short out, causing sparks.
    • How to avoid fires caused by heating appliances: simply unplug or turn off your heater when nobody is around to supervise it.  Not allowing the heater to overheat will also contribute to the act of avoiding flames.
  • As stated above, electrical shortages can create sparks, causing fires.  Generally, shortages don't happen "just because", they are usually caused by faulty wiring or by having too many things plugged in at once.  Although only ten percent of residential fires are caused by electrical shortages, it is still important to take what preventative measures you can. 
    • Avoiding electrical shortages is slightly more difficult than avoiding the fire starters previously discussed.  Having an electrician inspect your home or business is one of the safest ways to ensure that you aren't at risk especially if you live in an older home.  
  • If you're a smoker, chances are you've heard the "why smoking is bad for you" speech a million times over.  I'm not here to shame or commend your life choices, but, when you put your cigarette in the ashtray, check to see if there are any red ashes left.  Cigarette ashes only cause about five percent of house fires, but are the cause of about twenty-three percent of fire deaths.  This is because this fire most often starts while the resident is asleep.
    • How to prevent fire caused by cigarettes: ensure that your cigarette is fully put out when placed in the ashtray.
  • The fifth most common fire starter in the home is the beloved candle.  Didn't think Bath and Body Works could cause so much trouble huh?  Truthfully, this is another one of those situations where the open flame is fine, as long as somebody is supervising it.  Most fires caused by candles happen when the resident has left the home or when a flammable object, such as paper, is left within reach of the flame.
    • The best way to prevent fire caused by candles is to remove flammable objects from the surrounding area, as well as blowing the candle out when planning to leave it unsupervised.

Overall, house fires aren't completely preventable, but they are avoidable.  By watching what you do, keeping things tidy, and not leaving open flames unattended, you can save yourself a lot of money and frustration.

If for some reason you do experience the rage caused by fire damage, SERVPRO of Parker and Northeast Hood Counties is more than willing to help!  We are open 24/7/365 and are always ready to answer your calls.  You can contact us at 817-596-8714